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Electrical & Construction News Blog 
Wednesday, 26 January 2011

Members of the ELECTRI Council have approved four research projects for funding in 2011, with a total budget of $179,000. The four projects were selected from 51 proposals submitted by researchers from around the country.

“The Foundation has made a significant effort to select only the most timely and relevant proposals for funding, and the Council closely monitors the researchers’ progress,” said Foundation President Russ Alessi. “The Foundation’s mission is a true industry partnership between rigorous academic research and real-world application of those findings.”

2011 Foundation projects include:

Combining Charging Station Installation with Energy Efficiency Upgrades – An Emerging Market: Nearly 1 million electric vehicle charging stations will be installed in the U.S. by 2015. Combining these charging stations with additional services like facility energy audits could optimize the market potential for electrical contractors.  Researchers: Lonny Simonian, PE, PMP and Thomas Korman, PhD, PE, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis

An Economic Analysis of Portability: Portability remains a contentious labor issue for years, and this study seeks to quantify the financial impact it has on electrical contractors’ operations and the potential gain portability would offer. Researcher: Justin Reginato, PhD, PE, California State University, Sacramento

ELECTRI International – Preparing for the Next 20 Years: The Foundation has experienced phenomenal growth and success. With that success comes the responsibility to conduct a periodic internal audit of the Foundation’s operations and its readiness to response to industry, economic and social changes that could affect its mission and programs. Researchers: Carolyn Fazio, Fazio International, and Matt Syal, PhD, LEED AP, Michigan State University

National Energy Leadership Corps: The goal of this project is to expand the NECA student chapter program to include an entry-level energy auditing curriculum and service learning program. It will serve as the foundation for pending energy efficiency workforce development program being currently developed by Penn State. Researchers: David R. Riley, PhD, The Pennsylvania State University, and Steve Taylor, PhD, PE, Sustainable Industries.

Most 2011 research projects will be available in mid-2012. Complete proposals and status updates of ongoing research can be found at www.electri.org. Research reports can be purchased online at www.necanet.org/store. PDF files of the researchers' presentations at the 2011 January Council meeting can be viewed below.

ELECTRI International – The Foundation for Electrical Construction, Inc. is the primary research arm of the electrical construction industry. Foundation research helps to improve the productivity, professionalism, and competitiveness of electrical contractors. For more information, visit www.electri.org.

Source: NECAnet.org

Connexion Connexion AT 08:26 am   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
Tuesday, 18 January 2011
A Northwest Indiana group representing unionized building and construction trade workers has a New Year's resolution to secure more job commitments for its members.

The Northwestern Indiana Building & Construction Trades Council will ramp up its lobbying of municipal officials and even private developers to establish project labor agreements. With construction forecasts showing stagnant activity in the new year and declining union ranks, the labor movement is attempting to gather as much work as it can to tackle significant unemployment.

Business Manager Randy Palmateer said agreements typically require employers to pay workers at Indiana's prevailing wage and commit to employing local building trades workers. Workers for their part commit to not engage in a strike or work stoppage. He said Dyer, Hammond and Portage are among municipalities that have ordinances requiring certain public works projects to have a project labor agreement with the Building & Construction Trades Council.

"The (council) applauds communities that have had the foresight to pass ordinances to ensure a local work force is used (when spending) our tax dollars," Palmateer said.

Although opposition to the effort is likely, Palmateer said he'd like to see project labor agreements in every city and town in Lake, Porter, Newton and Jasper counties, the area the council covers.

These types of agreements have garnered attention at the federal level, even though they have been a part of projects for decades. President Barack Obama issued an executive order last year lifting a ban on them and encouraging federal agencies to use project labor agreements on construction projects valued at more than $25 million. Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn gave an executive order in March offering state agencies the opportunity to enter into project labor agreements on a case-by-case basis.

Palmateer, who also sits on the Crown Point Redevelopment Commission and Center Township Board, said these agreements ensure that personnel on job sites are trained adequately and are drug-free, and that projects come in on time and under budget.

J.R. Gaylor, president and CEO of the Indiana chapter of Associated Builders & Contractors Inc., disputed Palmateer's assertions, saying a project labor agreement doesn't provide anything a contractor doesn't expect already.

Gaylor, whose organization represents merit shop contractors, said he isn't against private developers deciding to forge project labor agreements with organized labor. But when working on municipal projects, he doesn't agree with a majority of contractors in the state being locked out of the bidding process and taxpayers having to pay more money for the project.

"But in the public setting, where taxpayers are the owner, there's no value in these (project labor agreements) for the taxpayers," Gaylor said. "They only increase prices significantly.

"Responsible bidders should get public works (projects). The best person with the best price should get the job. There shouldn't be a backroom deal based on political decisions."

On a statewide level, Gaylor said he doesn't see much ground being gained on project labor agreements. He estimates there are about 17,000 contractors in Indiana, about 11 percent of which collectively bargain with a union.

But Palmateer said without these protections, contractors would engage in a "race to the bottom" and local workers would lose the opportunity to earn fair compensation.

Source: Bowdeya Tweh, The Times, Munster, Ind via ENR-Midwest
Connexion Connexion AT 03:15 pm   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
Tuesday, 18 January 2011

With most of 2010 in the books, it looks as though experts who predicted a long, slow recovery from the nationwide recession have accurate crystal balls.

Unemployment is still high, home sales are still slow and money is still hard to borrow for all but those with the highest credit ratings.

But in talking with contractors and architects, there are faint glimmers of hope that 2011 will be another small step on the long, steep road to recovery that’s been predicted to last from five to 10 years.

McGraw-Hill Construction (which publishes Midwest Construction) recently released its estimates for 2011’s regional construction starts in the Midwest.

McGraw-Hill predicts that single-family housing starts will rise 23% in 2011, climbing from 16,225 units in 2010 to 19,900 units in 2011, and that multi-family housing starts will go up 7%, from 4,100 in 2010 to 4,400 in 2011.

Commercial and non-manufacturing building starts are predicted to rise from 9,525 to 11,175, or 17%.

Institutional and other nonresidential building starts will go from 19,600 to 19,875, or an increase of about 1%.

Starts for non-building construction, which includes projects such as roads, bridges, and dams, are expected to drop about 3%, from 30,850 in 2010 to 30,075 in 2011.

McGraw-Hill predicts that aggregated starts for all types of construction will rise from 80,300 in 2010 to 85,425 in 2011, a net increase of 6%.

The American Institute of Architects’ recently released Architecture Billings Index, which measures nationwide architectural activity, showed that September’s design activity had reached a reading of 50.4, up from 48.2 the month before.

It was the fourth consecutive month that the ABI had risen, and the first time since 2007 that it had broken a score of 50 – which indicates an increase in billings.

In addition, the University of Illinois’ Flash Index for October showed that the Illinois economy appears headed in the right direction. The October reading rose to 93.8, up from 93.5 in September. Although the index is still below 100 (the dividing line between a growing and declining economy), it is undoubtedly heading upward.

Economist J. Fred Giertz, who compiles the monthly index for the university’s Institute of Government and Public Affairs, says that the Flash Index’s recent performance is consistent with the national pattern of slow recovery.

Giertz says Illinois appears to be recovering, but that it is still a year or more away from reaching pre-recession unemployment rates.

To take the pulse of the industry in the Midwest, Midwest Construction recently took a quick survey of experts in the fields of architecture and construction, as well as the executive director of a construction-user association.

Most of the interviewees expressed cautious optimism about the coming year and said that they believe the industry is heading down the right path – albeit in small steps.

Walter D. Street III, architect with Johnson & Lee Ltd. Architects/Planners, and 2010 president of AIA Chicago, says that recent conditions may be the worst for architecture and construction since the Great Depression of the 1930s. But he feels that things are a little better now than at this time last year.

Street says that he’s seen more activity among healthcare clients and in the community development arena.

“People have projects to do, but they can’t get financing,” he says. He believes that seeing any improvement may take until the middle of the second quarter of next year.

“Chicago activity is still somewhat flat,” he says. “This recession is hanging on longer than previous ones and it’s unusual in that almost all segments are down at the same time.”

Street is also concerned that the length and severity of the current recession will hurt the architectural profession over the long-term by driving young and talented architects into other professions.

“There are architects who have now been unemployed for one and a half to two years,” he says. “Some have gone back to school for further architectural training, but some will leave the profession. That loss of talent will hurt us down the road.”

Grant Uhlir, principal in the Chicago office of Gensler, and immediate past president of AIA Chicago, says he holds cautious optimism for 2011.

“There are more opportunities to work, but business is still very competitive,” says Uhlir. He says he sees some capital being loosened up for design projects, as corporations begin investing in new headquarters, research facilities and industrial facilities, as well as improved energy efficiency for existing buildings.

Read more at ENR-Midwest

Source: Mike Larson, ENR-Midwest

Connexion Connexion AT 03:08 pm   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
Friday, 14 January 2011
by Jim Haughey, RCD Chief Economist


Construction materials suppliers expanded production 0.9% in November to 6% higher than a year ago. This overstates the strength of the market. Orders, production and shipments all increased at less than a 2% annual pace in the last quarter well below the rise in the construction materials price index so the market remains stalled, waiting for the expected improvement in construction spending in the next few months.

Manufacturers’ inventory/sales ratio dipped only to 1.37. It had been as high as 1.59 early in 2009. About 1.30 is a comfortable operating level so production gains will be less than sales gains well in to 2011.

Construction Materials

  Percent Change in…
  1 month 3 months 12 months 3 years
Production 0.9 0.5 6.0 -18.5
Prices 0.5 1.0 4.7 7.5
Orders 1.0 0.4 0.8 -13.8
Shipments 0.3 0.4 2.0 -13.3
Unfilled Orders 0.9 2.4 8.6 6.2
Inventory 0.2 0.0 3.4 -11.4
Inv/Sales Ratio -0.1 -0.4 1.4 2.2

Sources: US Dept. of Labor, US Dept. of Commerce, Federal Reserve Board

CAUTION: The Census Bureau indexes for construction materials are overstating the size of the market. The indexes are constructed by dividing the use of materials between construction, manufacturing and other end markets. This allocation uses the historical shares of purchases of steel, plastics, glass and other materials by each end market. The Census Bureau has no specific information on the share of steel production shipped to the construction market. As a result, the strong rise in manufacturing activity causes too much material sales to be assigned to construction.

Source: Reed Construction Data

Connexion Connexion AT 07:11 am   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
Friday, 14 January 2011

With the publication of the U.S. Department of Labor’s 2011 Regulatory Agenda in the Federal Register on December 20, 2010, NECA Director of Safety Jerry Rivera remarked, “As we anticipated, OSHA will have an aggressive agenda for regulatory activity in 2011.” In preparation, Rivera drafted a short version of planned OSHA activity and what the impact will on the electrical industry.

Rivera noted four areas that could most affect NECA contractors are: a “systems” approach to the Injury and Illness Prevention Program (I2P2); confined spaces in construction; the use of PPE in transmission and distribution work; and addition of the musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) column in Illness and Injury Recording and Reporting Requirements.

OSHA’s regulatory agenda is organized by three primary actions: Pre-rule, referring to areas on which the agency is considering taking action; Proposed Rule, detailing proposed additions, changes or deletions to regulatory text and contains a request for public comments; and Final Rule, which adds, changes, deletes or affirms regulatory text.

The potential impact of OSHA’s actions to NECA members and NECA’s planned responses are listed below. Key issues are noted with *.


OSHA ACTION: Pre-rule ITEM: Bloodborne Pathogens: September 2010 Request for comments published.

IMPACT ON NECA MEMBERS: This is most likely going to impact contractors employees expected to be exposed to bloodborne pathogens during their working duties such as first aid responders.

NECA RESPONSE: NECA will analyze the proposed rule during the pre-rule stage as it develops to assess impact on electrical contractors.


*OSHA ACTION: Pre-rule
ITEM: Injury and Illness Prevention Program (I2P2): Small Business Regulatory

Economic Fairness Act (SBREFA) panel will meet be initiated in the summer 2011.


IMPACT ON NECA MEMBERS: If the agency decides to move forward on this rule there will be some mandatory requirements for Injury and Illness Prevention Program core elements. OSHA is using the 1989 Safety and Health Program Management; Issuance of Voluntary Guidelines, ANSI/AIHA Z10 and OSHAS 18001 as guidance documents for the crafting of the rule.

NECA RESPONSE: NECA’s standing policy supports safety program development. NECA plans on submitting a representative to sit on the SBREFA panel to assess small business impact. NECA contractor have been using Injury and Illness Prevention Programs as a core element of their operations. NECA hopes to provide OSHA guidance on what safety program elements have worked for the electrical industry. NECA will also provide comments and testimony during the rulemaking process.


OSHA ACTION: Pre-rule
ITEM: Backing Operations: “New Request for Information”

IMPACT ON NECA MEMBERS: Electrical contractors that have workers exposed to moving equipment i.e. heavy construction equipment or motor vehicles will be affected by this rule.

NECA RESPONSE: As information is requested from industry stakeholders, NECA will asses rule for potential impact electrical contractors. NECA will reach out to membership for assistance with comments and participation in public hearings.


OSHA ACTION: Proposed rule
ITEM: Occupational Exposure to Crystalline Silica: “April 2011”


IMPACT ON NECA MEMBERS: Electrical contractors that have workers penetrating concrete structures through drilling or core drilling operations can expect to be affected by this rule. Other potential for scenarios include electrical contractor employees required to perform work around other trades while exposed.

NECA RESPONSE: NECA will asses the proposed permissible exposure limits (PEL) and construction activities that are expected to be covered under the proposed rule. NECA will also consider providing input on multiemployer scenarios.


OSHA ACTION: Proposed rule
ITEM: Walking Working Surfaces and Personal Fall Protection Systems Public (Slips, Trips, and Fall Prevention): Hearing January 2011


IMPACT ON NECA MEMBERS: This will affect electrical contractor’s performing work on general industry settings. OSHA’s intent is to update the standard requirements to reflect technological advances and consistency with construction standards.

NECA RESPONSE: OSHA will be holding a public hearing to address industry concerns. NECA provided written comments and anticipated participation in public hearing.


OSHA ACTION: Proposed rule
ITEM: Combustible Dust SBREFA panel April 2011


OSHA ACTION: Proposed rule ITEM: Occupational Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting Requirements--Modernizing OSHA's Reporting System: “September 2011 Notice of Rule making.”

IMPACT ON NECA MEMBERS: Electrical contractors should expect the recordkeeping of workplace injuries to be affected by this rule This will help OSHA have timely access to employer’s injury and illness data.

NECA RESPONSE: NECA will review potential employer impact of the proposed rule. NECA contractors should anticipate being called upon for comments or public testimony participation.


OSHA ACTION: Proposed rule ITEM: Occupational Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting Requirements--NAICS Update and Reporting Revisions: “Fall 2011”

IMPACT ON NECA MEMBERS: OSHA intends to begin using the NAISC instead of SIC codes. The NAISC code had been in use since 1997.

NECA RESPONSE: NECA will asses the transition from SIC to NAISC codes to ensure that quality of work related injuries applicable to the electrical industry are accurate and consistent.


*OSHA ACTION: Final rule ITEM: Confined Spaces in Construction: “November 2011”


IMPACT ON NECA MEMBERS: OSHA has reviewed industry comments and is crafting out the final rule. Four classifications are expected to be seen: Isolated-Hazard Confined Space, Controlled-Atmosphere Confined Space, Permit-Required Confined Space, and Continuous System-Permit-Required.


*OSHA ACTION: Final rule ITEM: Electric Power Transmission and Distribution; Electrical Protective Equipment: “May 2011”


IMPACT ON NECA MEMBERS: New requirements that could include FR clothing, AED requirements and MAD distance modifications.

NECA RESPONSE: NECA will craft out a summary of the most likely changes to the rule by March 2011.


OSHA ACTION: Final rule ITEM: Hazard Communication: “August 2011”

IMPACT ON NECA MEMBERS: Global harmonization of the hazardous chemicals will impact electrical contractor’s HAZCOM training program, signage and other areas.

NECA RESPONSE: NECA will craft out a summary of the most likely changes to the rule by March 2011


OSHA ACTION: Final rule ITEM: Cooperative Agreements: “September 2011”


IMPACT ON NECA MEMBERS: OSHA proposes to revise its regulations for the federally funded On-site

Consultation Programs such as Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP), allow Compliance Safety and Health Officers to proceed with enforcement visits resulting from referrals at sites undergoing Consultation visits and at sites that have been awarded SHARP status; and limit the deletion period from OSHA's programmed inspection schedule for those employers participating in the SHARP program.

NECA RESPONSE: No planned action.

*OSHA ACTION: Final rule ITEM: Occupational Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting Requirements--Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSD) Column: “February 2011”


IMPACT ON NECA MEMBERS: Significant change to the recording of musculoskeletal disorder. Industry stakeholders are concern that this could be a trampoline toward ergonomics. This could potentially signify contractor exposure to increased OSHA inspections if injury and illness rates are above industry average.

NECA RESPONSE: NECA has expressed opposition of the addition of the MSD’s column to OSHA 300 Form. The basis for opposition is that MSD type injuries are heavily influence by non-work-related activity.


Rivera pointed to OSHA's recent “letter of interpretation” of its noise standard to explain why NECA closely follows the agency’s regulatory agenda – it gives direct insight into the process OSHA is using and points to a trend that could affect future proposed standard changes.

For the noise standard, OSHA is currently "interpreting" the standard rather than going through the formal regulatory process for changes, and the interpretation thus far reads as if OSHA is expecting employers to remove as much of a hazard as possible from the workplace, with PPE being used as the last step of the hazard mitigation process – meaning that administrative and engineering controls must be considered first, leaving PPE as a last resort.

“This is a significant departure from how contractors have traditionally approached safety, and many NECA members are concerned with both the feasibility of engineering out hazards and OSHA using ‘interpreting’ rules, rather going than the formal rulemaking process,” Rivera said.

“We need rules and regulations that actively protect our workforce, and NECA members are committed to participating in a full OSHA rulemaking process,” Rivera said. “As the voice of the electrical construction industry, it’s our responsibility to speak up to make sure OSHA’s regulations aren’t made in a vacuum. We want to help the agency make a real impact on protecting workers rather than creating bureaucratic burdens and ideas that can’t actually be implemented successfully on the job.”

NECA, in partnership with the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, has sponsored a nationwide joint training program for nearly seven decades to ensure a well-trained and safe workforce.

More information about OSHA’s 2011 regulatory agenda can be found online.

Source: NECA News

Connexion Connexion AT 07:01 am   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
Tuesday, 11 January 2011

The Communications Cable and Connectivity Association (CCCA) announced that it recently completed large-scale, electrical performance testing of Category 6 copper patch cords.

Test results show an 85% failure rate in patch cords produced offshore by companies who are largely unknown in North America.

A second, large sample set of Category 6 copper patch cords produced by multiple, well-recognized manufacturers was also tested and showed 0% failure rate. Copper patch cords are typically used to connect network devices for signal routing (i.e. wall outlets, patch panels, switches, routers).

CCCA’s patch cord testing program follows the communications cable testing program conducted in 2008 and 2009, which uncovered a serious fire safety hazard with non-compliant copper data communications cable imported into North America.

To assure statistically meaningful results, CCCA tested a total of 499 samples from 16 brand names of Category 6 patch cords at a UL (Underwriters Laboratories) audited test lab. 322 of 379 patch cords made by offshore manufacturers, not generally known in North America, failed to meet minimum industry electrical performance requirements as specified in TIA 568-C.2. 78% of the failing samples failed by a margin of 3dB or more and 45% of the failing samples failed by margin of 6dB or more. Because noise is measured on a logarithmic scale, a 3dB failure indicates a noise level that is twice as high as the allowable standards and failures of this magnitude could contribute to significant network problems.

Included in the testing pool were 120 Category 6 copper patch cords from well-known manufacturers in North America. All had a 100% pass rate.

None of the failing products was identified as using independent, third party testing laboratories to verify quality. Patch cord testing and verification programs are available from leading independent testing agencies and generally provide a level of quality assurance to buyers.

Frank Peri, CCCA’s Executive Director said that “Once again, we see disturbing test results that seem to fit the pattern uncovered with our testing of offshore bulk data communications cable. The overwhelming failure rate of these offshore patch cords is very unsettling, suggesting that the manufacturers exporting these products are likely aware they are selling faulty products. The lack of third party verification with lesser known brands should put all users on alert to be sure they are getting the performance they expect and are paying for.”

CCCA emphasizes that many of its members are well recognized global companies with offshore manufacturing facilities and business operations. The quality issues and failure to comply with industry standards are not necessarily regional in nature, but rather the result of the use of low quality components, poor assembly methods, and poor quality controls, which can improve profit margin for the manufacturer.

About CCCA
CCCA, a non-profit corporation formed in 2007, has a mission to serve as the major resource for well researched, fact-based information on the technologies and products of structured cabling media to support current and future needs of the networking, IT and communications industries. CCCA also is proactive at codes and standards bodies and other trade, industry and governmental organizations in communicating and influencing policy and decisions affecting the quality, performance and societal needs of the structured cabling infrastructure.

CCCA member companies: ADC; Accu-Tech; AlphaGary; Anixter; Belden; Berk-Tek, a Nexans Company; Cable Components Group; CommScope; Daikin America; DuPont; 3M Dyneon; General Cable; Optical Cable Corporation (OCC); OFS, a Furukawa Company; PolyOne; Sentinel Connector Systems; Solvay Solexis; Superior Essex; Tyco Electronics.
Headquarters: 1001 Pennsylvania NW, Washington, DC, 20004. For further information, contact Frank Peri, Executive Director at fperi@cccassoc.org or via phone at (904) 223-4100

Source: CCCA press release

Connexion Connexion AT 11:11 am   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
Monday, 10 January 2011

Builders began work on more homes and the government boosted its investment in federal construction projects in November, marking a third straight monthly increase in construction activity after a dismal summer.

Construction spending increased 0.4 percent in November, the Commerce Department said Monday. Still, building activity is only 2.3 percent higher than in August, when it had fallen to the lowest level in a decade.

The industry has struggled since 2006 when the housing market went bust and helped trigger the worst recession since the 1930s. It also cut into demand for commercial projects such as office buildings and shopping centers.

Total spending increased to $810.2 billion in November at a seasonally adjusted annual rate.

The strength in November came from a 0.7 percent rise in private residential construction which increased to $235.7 billion at an annual rate. That marked the third straight gain.

November was the first time in seven months that housing construction, excluding renovation projects, rose.

Ian Shepherdson, chief U.S. economist at High Frequency Economics, said home construction had been declining for months since the expiration of a federal home-buying tax credit expired in the spring.

"It now looks as though homebuilding activity has finally hit bottom," Shepherdson said. "A sustained recovery is still some way off, though."

Spending on private nonresidential projects dropped for a second straight month. It fell 0.1 percent to an annual rate of $256.1 billion. The weakness reflected widespread spending declines on offices, hotels and shopping centers.

Builders have had trouble obtaining financing for projects since the recession. Banks have tightened credit standards in response to rising default rates.

Spending for government projects rose 0.7 percent to an annual rate of $318.5 billion. State and local government building dipped 0.1 percent.

The one bright spot was federal projects, which jumped 8.2 percent to $35.5 billion - a record level. Analysts said this category has been boosted by the economic stimulus package that President Barack Obama got through Congress in February 2009 a month after taking office.

However, analysts cautioned that government spending is likely to decrease in the second half of 2011. Government projects are winding down, and the new Congress and many state governments are aiming to trim spending in response to sizable budget deficits.

Kenneth Simonson, chief economist for the Associated General Contractors, said he expects declines in a number of federal categories, from stimulus projects to spending to support the military base realignment program.

Patrick Newport, an economist at IHS Global Insight, predicted that spending on single-family homes and apartment construction will remain lackluster and nonresidential construction will continue to decline.

"Construction spending may have turned the corner, but a solid rebound is months away," he said.

Source: Architecural Record

Connexion Connexion AT 05:08 pm   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
Wednesday, 05 January 2011

The IEEE has approved a new standard and begun several new standards projects related to power transformers.

The new standard is IEEE C57.12.10, "Standard Requirements for Liquid-Immersed Power Transformers." This voluntary consensus standard sets forth the requirements for outdoor power transformer application. It covers performance, interchangeability, and safety of equipment, and can assist in the proper selection of such equipment.

IEEE also approved a revision to an earlier transformer standard, IEEE C57.12.80, "Standard Terminology for Power and Distribution Transformers."

In addition, IEEE has approved work to begin on two new transformer-related standards. The first, IEEE PC57.13.7, "Standard for Current Transformers with a Maximum mA Secondary Current of 250mA," will provide the performance requirements for electrical system and test interchangeability for current transformers with milliampere output, which are not covered in the base IEEE C57.13 standard.

The second new project, IEEE PC57.13-2008/Cor 1™, will correct a figure in the "IEEE Standard Requirements for Instrument Transformers."

IEEE has also launched revisions to three earlier standards: IEEE PC57.12.28, "Standard for Pad Mounted Equipment - Enclosure Integrity"; IEEE PC57.12.29, "Standard for Pad Mounted Equipment - Enclosure Integrity for Coastal Environments"; and IEEE PC57.136, "Guide for Sound Level Abatement and Determination for Liquid-Immersed Power Transformers and Shunt Reactors Rated Over 500 kVA."

Source: Transmission & Distribution World

Connexion Connexion AT 03:44 pm   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
Wednesday, 05 January 2011

Here’s your update! Mike’s “Safest States” ranking has become an annual report that is widely anticipated. In his continued dedication to safety, Mike’s analysis rates and assigns a safety grade to each of the U.S. states based on the state’s requirements for the electrical industry. The standard for measurement in these findings comes from the state-wide adoption of the requirement, and we do acknowledge that there may be counties within the states that may rate higher that are not reflected in the data reported.Image1

Congratulations to Minnesota, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota and Wyoming for their “A+” rating. These states have set the standard for electrical safety by adopting the most current Code on a state-wide level, requiring licensing for Inspectors, Apprentices, Journeymen, Master Electricians and Professional Engineers, as well as requiring continuing education at the state level for all of these classifications.

We'd also like to congratulate Nebraska for being the most improved state. Their grade has gone from B to A- due to the adoption of the 2008 NEC which becomes effective in July 2010, and the requirement for PDH for Engineers, which we had not reported accurately in July 2009.

We acknowledge and congratulate all those states that continue to set high standards in electrical safety.

The chart below summarizes our findings. To find out how the 2010 grades were determined, click here or click on the map image to see the complete spreadsheet.

2010 Data
2009 Data
2007 Data

State

2007

2009

2010

Change

Reason for Change

ALABAMA

B-

C-

C-

0

 

ALASKA

B

B+

A-

+1

PDH required for Engineers

ARIZONA

D

D

D

0

 

ARKANSAS

A-

A-

A-

0

 

CALIFORNIA

A-

A-

A-

0

 

COLORADO

C+

B-

B-

0

 

CONNECTICUT

A-

A-

A-

0

 

DC

C

C

C

0

 

DELAWARE

A-

B+

A-

+1

08NEC effective 11/11/09

FLORIDA

B+

B

B+

+1

08NEC effective 10/1/09

GEORGIA

B

B-

B-

0

 

HAWAII

B-

C

C

0

 

IDAHO

B+

B+

A-

+1

PDH required for Engineers

ILLINOIS

D

D

D

0

 

INDIANA

C-

C-

C-

0

 

IOWA

D

A-

A

+1

Inspectors req. CEUs

KANSAS

C-

D

D

0

 

KENTUCKY

A-

A-

A

+1

08NEC effective 9/1/09

LOUISIANA

C

C+

B-

+1

08NEC effective 1/1/2010

MAINE

A

A

A

0

 

MARYLAND

D

D

D

0

 

MASSACHUSETTS

A-

A+

A

-1

*No PDH required for Engineers

MICHIGAN

A-

A-

A

+1

08NEC effective 12/2/09

MINNESOTA

B+

A+

A+

0

 

MISSISSIPPI

D+

D+

D+

0

 

MISSOURI

D+

D

D

0

 

MONTANA

B

B

B

0

 

NEBRASKA

B+

B

A-

+2

08NEC effective 7/12/10;*PDH for Engineers

NEVADA

C-

C-

C-

0

 

NEW HAMPSHIRE

A-

A-

A-

0

 

NEW JERSEY

B+

A-

A-

0

 

NEW MEXICO

B+

B+

B+

0

 

NEW YORK

D+

D+

D+

0

 

NORTH CAROLINA

A

A

A

0

 

NORTH DAKOTA

A+

A+

A+

0

 

OHIO

A-

B+

B+

0

 

OKLAHOMA

A+

A+

A+

0

 

OREGON

A+

A+

A+

0

 

PENNSYLVANIA

C

C-

C

+1

Inspectors req. CEUs

RHODE ISLAND

A

A

A

0

 

SOUTH CAROLINA

B-

B-

B

+1

08NEC effective 7/1/09

SOUTH DAKOTA

A

A+

A+

0

 

TENNESSEE

B

B

B

0

 

TEXAS

B+

A-

A-

0

 

UTAH

A

A

A

0

 

VERMONT

B

B+

A-

+1

PDH required for Engineers

VIRGINIA

B+

A-

A-

0

 

WASHINGTON

A-

A

A

0

 

WEST VIRGINIA

B

B

B+

+1

08NEC effective 7/1/2010

WISCONSIN

A-

A-

A-

0

 

WYOMING

A

A+

A+

0

 

PUERTO RICO

B

B-

B-

0

 

*Previously reported incorrectly.
Remember that all grades are based on the state standard.

Source: Mike Holt

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